Special Post by Tami Boehmer

This is a very special post by Tami Boehmer. I am reblogging it here, but I will also add the original link:

http://www.tamiboehmer.com/2015/07/no-expiration-date-a-tribute-to-our-angel-krysti-hughett/

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No expiration date:  A Tribute to our angel, Krysti Hughett

Krysti's

Last night, I lay in bed and couldn’t sleep. I didn’t know that my dear friend, Krysti Hughett, drew her last breath just an hour before. Maybe my body and soul could sense it. Krysti passed away on July 7, after more than 10 years of beating the odds of very aggressive stage IV inflammatory breast cancer. She accomplished such an overwhelming task with her determination, incredible intelligence, and tender love and support she  gave to others. Yet I can feel her presence as if she was still here. And in a way she is.

It is no coincidence I met Krysti while she was helping others. It was about six years ago, and Krysti was leading a Young Survival Coalition (YSC) support conference call for stage IV breast cancer survivors. I was fairly new at the game and nervous about reaching out for help. It was then that Krysti earned the moniker I gave her – “resource queen.” She told me about a magical place called Camp Kesem and suggested my daughter would like to attend. Her own daughter Molly had been going and loved it. I signed Chrissy up for that summer and she and Molly (AKA camp name Mo Mo) became cabin mates and fast friends. We’d meet up with Krysti and her husband Bill at camp and have dinner afterward. It became our tradition.

Image 5Krysti was my mentor and friend. She let me in on so many cancer perks I’d otherwise would have not known about. In addition to Camp Kesem, there was a  wonderful mountain retreat weekend through an organization called Image Reborn. You better believe I took advantage of that and passed it along to my breast cancer friends.

Krysti was also my inspiration and fountain of information for clinical trials. Krysti, I found, knew more about them than many of my doctors.  It extended her life and many others  she so freely advised. I once told her she should get paid for the hours upon hours of consulting she provided for so many people. She shot me down of course. Krysti gave with love; money had nothing to do with it.

Every year we met at Camp Kesem, Krysti would joyously announce that she made it another year to see Molly go to camp. She loved that place, and she loved her girls – Molly, Mindy and Megan. We had a special relationship, but I knew I shared her with so many people who also had a special relationship with this remarkable lady. As she said in her final note, she was loved.

Last Thursday, I went up to Indianapolis with my friend Joules Evans for my scan and blood work for my upcoming clinical trial. Afterwards we stopped in and visited Krysti who was at a nearby hospital. We were among many people who gathered at her bedside. Krysti was struggling to breathe but took off her oxygen mask so she could talk to me. I instinctively stroked her head as she labored to speak. I asked if I was bothering her but she assured me it felt very good. I wanted to give back some of that love and caring she so generously shared with me. We reminisced how we met, and she wanted to know about my clinical trial. Her mind was still sharp as ever and she let me know it sounded promising. I told her I loved her very much and she said she loved me.

There seemed to be little left to be said, but as I turned to head out the door, she had one thing to say to me. “Please let everyone know how you’re doing on your trial.” She wanted me to keep in touch with her family and friends. And I suspect, that she will be listening from above as I give my updates. I know on some deep level that Krysti is watching over me and everyone she has loved. She is just next door, in another dimension, but is still helping everyone. I can feel that right now as I write this.

Image 1Krysti’s legacy lives on, and I’m grateful to play a small role in that. Her story is one of the many featured in my book, Miracle Survivors: Beating the Odds of Incurable Cancer. I know Krysti would want you to read it because her story is so encouraging, just like she was in her life.

I’ll leave you with a Krysti quote from my book:  “At one point, I was NED (No Evidence of Disease). I call it No Expiration Date. When my husband got me a handicapped sticker – which I needed because I had a brain tumor at the time – it said no expiration. That’s what I focus on whenever I’m in my car. I want to stamp that on my forehead.”

I know one thing for sure, there is no expiration for the memories and
legacy Krysti leaves behind. Your body may have expired; but your spirit will forever be with us.

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Tami is an amazing person whose story and phenomenal books are incredibly inspirational. After her five-year, cancer-free anniversary she had a metastatic recurrence of breast cancer in 2008. Tami was shocked when One doctor told her, “You could live two years or 20 years, but you’ll die from breast cancer.”
Image 4Tami explains, “I wanted talk with other cancer survivors who didn’t accept doctors’ predictions–people who beat the odds. I was determined to find out how they did it so I could do it myself.  So I started searching for “miracle survivors” nationwide for my book, From Incurable to Incredible: Cancer Survivors Who Beat the Odds.”

Image 6Her new book called  Miracle Survivors: Beating the Odds of Incurable Cancer, was released in November 2014 .You will find all new stories, but Tami again says “it’s the same message: there is hope no matter what the circumstances.

I feel as if I’m fulfilling God’s purpose for me through this work. It has taught me cancer doesn’t have to be a death sentence. Like the people I’ve interviewed, cancer for me was the beginning of a new way of life; one of appreciation, hope, and discovering one’s potential.”

Please learn more about Tami and visit her blog at: http://www.tamiboehmer.com

Survival – A Widow’s Journal

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In Survival, A Widow’s Journal, Muriel Kagan Zager describes her experiences following the loss of her husband, Victor, after 56 years of marriage. Her reactions to her new status and the unexpected reactions of others to her situation provide an insight into what new realities she faced.  She discovered that some people she thought would be there for her were not; and some she little knew became life-lines for her.

Psychologists and therapists in the field have praised the work; many feeling that it should be used as a text for students learning about mourning. Widows and others going through the loss of a loved one have been helped through Muriel Kagan Zager’s journey.

I am so proud of my mother who wrote Survival, A Widow’s Journal. She is a journalist who specializes as a correspondent in the Middle East and an accomplished author. She has published four novels and she just published her fifth book call Survival – A Widow’s Journal. The book is based on a true story about my father who died of pancreatic cancer on June 6, 2008. I think that anyone who has lost a loved one to cancer or any other reason will really be helped by her book. Many of you will also will enjoy reading it because  she tells her story with wonderful grace. She’s a fantastic writer.

My mom let my sister and I read it before it was published and I also have read different parts of it again throughout this week. The book just came out a week ago. I want to tell you a little about my father, Victor, and his experience with cancer. He had kidney cancer aka renal cell cancer 15 years before he died of pancreatic cancer. The kidney cancer was caught early enough and they were able to take the damaged kidney from the cancer out surgically, and he required no further treatment besides the usual follow ups.

In early 2008 he was more tired than usual and his regular MD thought he had sinus infections and kept giving him antibiotics. He traveled with my mom for business and pleasure all over the world. Ten days before his diagnosis he felt horrible and his stomach got very bloated. He spent Memorial Day weekend at home in terrible pain and would not let my mom take him to the hospital. He didn’t want to bother his MD.

Finally when the holiday was over he had an MRI and it was discovered that he had metastatic cancer all over his body. If you read my mom’s book there is much more detail about what happened. We managed to get him on a medical plane to Nashville where most of the family including his grandchildren were able to see him at the hospital the last five days of his life. We later determined that he had pancreatic cancer.

I was happy that my dad lived out his last six months not knowing how sick he was and able to just enjoy his life. We had wonderful moments during his life as well as while he was in the hospital.

My father was an amazing man.  I am so grateful for the time I had with him and I am so lucky that I have grown up with such special parents and siblings, and my mom continues to bring me joy every day!

I urge all of you to check out my moms book. Below is a great review written by someone very special to my mom and me.

“What does it take to face the death of your husband of 50 years?  Can you be strong enough to survive and re-enter the world?  Muriel Kagan Zager has written the most honest and passionate love story in “SURVIVAL, A Widow’s Journal.”  As you hear the pulse of Muriel’s heart in every honest sentence, you will also feel the agony, the loneliness and the finality of the death of Victor, her spouse.  There is no smoothing over the misery, the heartbreak and the predestination of “who will live and who will die,” and when.  There are many books written about the wonder of life, but this is a passionate story about love, loneliness and survival.  “SURVIVAL” is worth reading for anyone who has faced a future of uncertainty.”

To Order the book and peak inside click here to go to amazon.com.

Celebrating the Extra-Ordinary: Her name is Shelby

In the blog, “Journeying beyond Breast Cancer” Marie challenged other bloggers to celebrate the ordinary by taking a photo of something every day that makes them feel grateful.  When my friend Li Bailey died on January 6, 2012 of Metastatic Breast Cancer (see earlier blog My Fearless Friend Li Bailey) , she left me with a gift that she asked me to take care of when she found out she was going to die from Breast Cancer.  It was her beautiful dog Shelby. Li knew that I adored Shelby from the first day she arrived at her home.

When Li got Shelby, Li had completed her primary chemo and moved to a bigger apartment so she could have a puppy. Shelby arrived around Christmas in 2005 and when I visited Li, I loved playing with Shelby and she is just the sweetest dog that anyone could ever ask for. Shelby brought so much joy in to Li’s life and continues to bring me joy every day.

The day Li died, I took Shelby and all of her things to my home. We spent the day together as she got used to her new home. Shelby acted as though this was a new fun adventure. I am so grateful to have her in my life and she continues to keep my friend alive in my mind by just being herself. I love Shelby so much! She is a fun, happy, adorable dog with the most beautiful eyes.

Earlier today I was feeling sad because I missed my friend. I walked with Shelby like I do everyday and when we got home I felt so much better. She was sitting on the floor looking so pretty that I took her picture and realized just how grateful I am for having had Li in my life and having been blessed with her incredible gift of Shelby.

I also want to thank Marie for giving all of us bloggers a great idea to post about.