Below is information taken from the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) web site explaining what the symposium is all about. Although I was unable to attend this year, I have attended in 2009 and 2010 and it is a very exciting fast paced meeting with incredible presentations of abstracts and clinical trials that are all about breast cancer.

In the evening the Alamo Breast Cancer Foundation had wonderful medical professional speakers that have many patient advocates as well as advocates who receive a scholarship in attendance to go over the presentations that went on during the day. Some of my fellow bloggers and friends including AnneMarie (Chemobrain….In the Fog With BC from 2 AD), Lori (regrounding),(CJ (metavivor.org), Gayle (pinkribbonblues.org), Jody  (women with cancer), and many more attended and they have blogged and tweeted about the conference.

I have followed the conference and put articles in my daily breast cancer newspaper at http://www.scoop.it/t/breast-cancer-news. I have picked a great source called Onc Live that has a great review of the presentations in articles that if you missed the conference or just wanted to know about it, here is an excellent place to read articles of presentations in San Antonio.

I had hoped this year would bring more research for Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC) and as a patient advocate I am discouraged because there wasn’t much news on MBC, except progress with those that are HER-2 positive. As a patient advocate I think that all of us need to use our voices to get funding for more research when it comes to MBC.SABCS-AACR-Logo

About SABCS

Meeting Profile

For thirty-five years, the symposium’s mission has been to provide state-of-the-art information on breast cancer research.  From a one-day regional conference, the symposium has grown to a five-day program attended by a broad international audience of academic and private researchers and physicians from over 100 countries.

The symposium aims to achieve a balance of clinical, translational, and basic research, providing a forum for interaction, communication, and education for a broad spectrum of researchers, health professionals, and those with a special interest in breast cancer.

In 2007, the Cancer Therapy & Research Center (CTRC) at UT Health Science Center San Antonio and the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) announced a collaboration for the future of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.  The symposium has been renamed the CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.  Complementing the clinical strengths of the highly regarded annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, the AACR’s scientific prestige in basic, translational and clinical cancer research will create a unique and comprehensive scientific meeting that will advance breast cancer research for the benefit of patients.

In 2005, Baylor College of Medicine became a joint sponsor of the symposium and will remain in the CTRC-AACR collaboration.

C. Kent Osborne, MD, Professor of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Director, Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Director, Breast Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Peter M. Ravdin, MD, PhD, Ruth McLean Bowman Bowers Chair for Breast Cancer Research & Treatment, Director of the Breast Cancer Program, UT Health Science Center San Antonio and Carlos L. Arteaga, MD, Director, Breast Cancer Program Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University are Co-Directors of the symposium.

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Oncology Conference Articles
The mental toll and stress of a breast cancer diagnosis might factor into the cognitive impairment experienced during chemotherapy treatment, commonly referred to as “chemo brain.”
Eight-year follow-up data from the phase III HERA trial has confirmed that 1-year of adjuvant trastuzumab should remain the treatment standard in women with HER2-positive early-stage breast cancer.
Patients with triple-negative breast cancer had no statistically significant improvement in disease-free survival when they received adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy plus 1 year of bevacizumab.
Eribulin mesylate failed to show a statistically significant survival benefit compared with capecitabine in women with previously treated metastatic breast cancer.
Long-term follow-up results showed that the hypofractionated regimens were as effective as the 50-Gy standard in women with early-stage breast cancer.
Patients with triple-negative breast cancer who have residual disease after receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy have a series of genetic alterations that are clinically targetable and may warrant further study.
Preliminary research suggests that in-vitro exposure to an HDAC inhibitor may sensitize triple-negative breast cancer cells to treatment with a PARP inhibitor and cisplatin.
Adjuvant chemotherapy improved survival rates in women with isolated local or regional breast cancer recurrence, according to results from the CALOR trial.
Postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer lived longer when they received a 500-mg dose of fulvestrant as compared with a 250-mg dose.
Combining the investigational PD 0332991 with letrozole as first-line therapy extended progression-free survival in women with advanced estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer.
Sentinel lymph node surgery may provide a less-invasive alternative to axillary lymph node dissection for nodal staging in node-positive breast cancer.
Extending the duration of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment to 10 years was more effective than the standard 5 years of treatment in protecting against recurrence and death among women with ER+ breast cancer.

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